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Morrissey The National Front Disco Lyrics

Last updated: 11/29/2013 05:55:48 AM

David, the wind blows
The wind blows ...
Bits of your life away
Your friends all say ...
"Where is our boy ? Oh, we've lost our boy"
But they should know
Where you've gone
Because again and again you've explained that
You're going to ...

Oh, you're going to ...
Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah
"England for the English !
England for the English !"

David, the winds blow
The winds blow ...
All of my dreams away
And I still say :
"Where is our boy ? Ah, we've lost our boy"
But I should know
Why you've gone
Because again and again you've explained
You've gone to the ...

National, ah ...
To the National ..
There's a country; you don't live there
But one day you would like to
And if you show them what you're made of
Oh, then you might do ...

But David, we wonder
We wonder if the thunder
Is ever really gonna begin
Begin, begin
Your mom says :
"I've lost my boy"
But she should know
Why you've gone
Because again and again you've explained
You've gone to the :

National
To the National
To the National Front Disco
Because you want the day to come sooner
You want the day to come sooner
You want the day to come sooner
When you've settled the score

Oh, the National
Oh, the National
Oh, the National
Oh, the National

Thanks to Pieter Weijers-McGovern for submitting The National Front Disco Lyrics.



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The closeted National Front follower... | Reviewer: JH | 11/29/13

I always found this satire extremely clever, because all the behavioral signifiers are like a young closeted gay man, feeling unnaccepted by his family and friends, who secrets out of the house to go to the clubs. The brilliant conceit is that it is the National Front disco, as if they'd ever have a disco in the first place...

Very, very clever...

Who is David? | Reviewer: Carl | 6/23/13

a fictional character?...or is Moz simply having another little pop at Bowie here? (bearing in mind Mick Ronson was producer for the album version).

The use of a "third person", in this case "David", is the interest here, otherwise there is no content in the actual lyrics and it's just a great tune....though it's funny reading other intepretations and attempts to politicise a simple song.

In Defence of Moz | Reviewer: Basil | 3/9/13

Attention idiots: Morrissey is not glorifying racism, he's satirising it, and reflecting the disturbing nationalistic sentiment that swept the country in the eighties. He's said some pretty contraversial things that might better qualify the view of him as a racist, but this song just attempts to get into the mindset of a disenchanted youth who loses himself to the National Front in the quest for something greater than his own troubled life in Thatcherite Britain. The artist can sympathise with and express everything, and not every song need have a good-old fashione moral to it anyhow, though Morrissey is obviously one of the most anti-nationalistic people alive in Britian today.

hello morrissey | Reviewer: durham | 6/9/12

"I have to laugh at all the leftists on here pissing themselves over the fact that their sensitive animal loving idol might have had Nationalist views. Since when has Morrisey ever been politically correct? You just want to perpeptuate the stereotype that everyone with right wing views is automatically a thuggish yob and that you are the enlightened middle class intelectuals. Your all a bunch of cowards who have swallowed cultural marxist education, thus blinding yourselves to the plainly obvious that any common man can see. You will defend every minority who suffers from racism, but you won't defend yourselves and your own countrymen from disrespectful, intollerant, minorities. Racism is simply a one way street for you and you prove this by mongrelizing your children and pandering to every minorities needs, pathetic!"

Nice to hear from you Morrissey. Nice of you to educate some of these apologists.

The real meaning of this song is in the title.... | Reviewer: Anonymous | 9/2/11

Leftist here. National Front D I S C O. What do you think Moz means by adding this single word? It's quite hilarious that racists grabbed onto this song. Morrissey never said what it was about. Not because the song is racist, actually quite the opposite. He's making fun of the National Front. They have a disco, see? He's calling them, well, you figure it out. David is very confused indeed.

........................................ | Reviewer: UnyieldingDefiance | 8/31/10

"Morrissey used to get beaten up by 12year olds when he was 16 and in that part of Manchester there was a big asian comunity."

What proof do you have of this mad assertion?

I have to laugh at all the leftists on here pissing themselves over the fact that their sensitive animal loving idol might have had Nationalist views. Since when has Morrisey ever been politically correct? You just want to perpeptuate the stereotype that everyone with right wing views is automatically a thuggish yob and that you are the enlightened middle class intelectuals. Your all a bunch of cowards who have swallowed cultural marxist education, thus blinding yourselves to the plainly obvious that any common man can see. You will defend every minority who suffers from racism, but you won't defend yourselves and your own countrymen from disrespectful, intollerant, minorities. Racism is simply a one way street for you and you prove this by mongrelizing your children and pandering to every minorities needs, pathetic!

NFD | Reviewer: Dan | 3/17/10

Moz in his pomp! the guy is a great mind, a thinker, able to articulate his thought and perspective into beautiful (and often hilairious) verse.

Never one to shy away from contoversy im guessing this was a mish mash of self experience and also things he had seen and his perspective on the atmosphere of the time of what it would be like being a young white male on the dole and questioning his national identity, portraying it through the young eyes of a lad called David and his family and friends. Whatever it was I think Moz picked up perfectly on the ignorance and fears of a stereotypical young white man of the time, and still to this day.

The press are a fickle bunch and dont like to be made to think, so took the lyrics as 'black and white' (if u'll pardon the pun), i really do believe that the Morrissey was never truly forgiven by the general public after the zombiefied music media pilliored him about this......... idiots!

As for the debate on whether Mozza actually holds these beliefs, I guess there's only one person that knows.............



sarcasm and double meaning | Reviewer: jeremy | 1/5/10

Ever heard of it? If this song (and Morrissey) was racist, i don't know if his records would be sold in stores and if he;d be allowd to give as many gigs as he does. I never heard Morrissey promote national socialism.

I think his use of skin heads in some of his video's and the song suedehead don't count as any valid prove. First of all because the orginal skin heads weren't rasist, but people who listened to ska and based their style upon Jamaican culture.
Second of all because Morrissey is known for his use of icons. Like it wasn't unusal for him to decorate his house with posters of the Smiths or the people he admired. It's just a style of clothing, poorly abused by racists, he likes.

Get over it, and pay some attention.

'skinheads with nail varnish' | Reviewer: Anonymous | 11/4/09

Moz? Sensitive, talented and gay Moz? Proud to be British, even proud to be white? Can't be. Just as Eric Clapton never said Enoch Powell was right. Just as Dali never supported Franco. Because we all 'know' that artists, the good ones anyway, are free of nationalist sentiment and have nothing but disdain for Western Civilization. Given the chance they would gang rape Western Civilization in the parking lot of Richmond High School after a homecoming dance.

Now that the NF has become the BNP and has two MEPs we also 'know' Moz, and other sensitive, talented and gay artists couldn't possibly approve. And we 'know' Moz couldn't possibly currently live in Italy with that horrid right wing, anti-immigration government in power.

We 'know' a lot, don't we? We know Sweet FA in fact.

Anti-Racist Lyrics | Reviewer: Simon | 10/30/09

Morrissey is certainly not racist and the first reviewer was right to say he is mocking those with racist attitudes.In particular, he is mocking the racist views that were associated with football hooliganism in the early 1990s, and don't forget this song is from the album 'Your Arsenal'. It is also clear he is mocking racism when one considers that the song before the National Front Disco - We'll Let You Know - also ridicules those who believe they are 'the last truly British people you'll ever know' (Morrissey whispers at the end 'ever, never want to know' to show his own disdain of such people). In both these songs, Morrissey uses satire, putting himself inside the characters of the songs in order to expose them. Charles Dickens used a similar technique in his novels to highlight poverty and to create social awareness. As other reviewers have hinted at, this song is aimed at airing discussion on a crisis in British-especially English-identity, and to show the errors of those who try to preserve a Britain that-thankfully-does not exist anymore. Not a racist song, quite the opposite!

Isn't Morrissey Mocking Racism? | Reviewer: Stephen | 10/3/09

To those who find evidence in the lyrics of Morrissey's own personal racism, well, I think you've got it wrong. "National Front Disco?" C'mon, isn't that a rather undignified way to characterize the ambitions of an ugly sentiment by placing it in the ridiculous location of frivolity? "We've lost our boy?" What does that mean but Morrissey thinks that the boy is "lost" to racism, which is not a positive connotation, is it?

Now, "You're the One for Me, Fatty": THAT'S MEAN.

not racist | Reviewer: Anonymous | 9/26/09

morrissey's racist fact, please read the lyrics again and realise that this song shows the ignorance of a person joining the national front and not really knowing what he's joining for. no straight answers, no real explanation or backing to his reasons. neil, manchester, england.

MORRISSEY IS RACIST (FACT) | Reviewer: David | 9/15/09

This song is about morrissey.he has been quoted as saying He doesnt Hate asians he just doesnt like them very much.Morrissey used to get beaten up by 12year olds when he was 16 and in that part of Manchester there was a big asian comunity.Im guessing that morrissey got bullied by them and so carries round the scars.He can not come out and say it as he would never sell another record but its festering in him,as it is so many working class white boys.Irish blood,English heart is along the same lines.Why cant i be proud to be a working class white boy.poletitions make damn sure i cant be.bengali in platforms is another tune with the line...Don�t blame me
Don�t hate me
Just because I�m the one to tell you


That life is hard enough when you belong here.

Morrissey is one the most talented people the north have every bred and yes he carries a certain workingclass ethos that a politition would call racist but the average working class man would call normal.

Rockin' | Reviewer: Dan | 12/31/07

Great tune. Being a Yank I always thought this tune more about human alienation and intellectual revenge. But I guess it has some upfront politics in it from across the pond.

Not a racist | Reviewer: Anonymous | 6/7/07

I love this song i feel it is excellent as it portrays a deeper message not that Morrissey is a filthy racist just that he shows that how pathetic these racist parties are