One Wing In The Fire Lyrics - Trent Tomlinson



Review The Song (5)


Daddy's been a back-row Baptist
With his share of front-row sin
His Saturday night still on his breathe
Every Sunday when he'd walk in
He's never led the Benediction
He's never sang in the choir
But he's an angel with no halo
An' one wing in the fire

Mamma lives by the Bible
The Bible lives by the bed
An' she's lied alone so many nights
With scriptures in her head.
Prayin', Good Lord, just be with him
I know his Faith is tired
But he's an angel with no halo
An' one wing in the fire

An' I know he lives a little left of livin' right
An he's come close to goin' way too far a few times
But I'd trade a thousand prayers
If just one prayer would come true
Lord, please believe in him, like I believe in you

Daddy's always been there for me
From T-Ball to touchdowns
Fixed my car an' fixed my heart
When they've been broken down
I know he calls for more forgiveness
Than most folks do require
But he's an angel with no halo
An' one wing in the fire

An' I know he lives a little left of livin' right
An he's come close to goin' way too far a few times
But I'd trade a thousand prayers
If just one prayer would come true
Lord, please believe in him, like I believe in you

Well, I just can't imagine
What Heaven might be like
If me an' Mamma make it
Without Daddy by our side
Lord, could you please remember
When it's time to call us higher
That he's an angel with no halo
An' one wing in the fire

oh oooh




Writer: BOBBY OLEN PINSON, TRENT TOMLINSON
Lyrics © BMG RIGHTS MANAGEMENT US, LLC



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We All Know Someone With One Wing in the Fire | Reviewer: Randy Ehrler | 5/27/12

We All Know Someone With One Wing in the Fire

A Review of “One Wing in the Fire” by Tent Tomlinson

I think we all have someone in our lives who fits the description in this song – a man with a heart of gold, the kind of man who would come to help you anytime – day or night – no questions asked. This is a man who loves and cares about others, and shows it daily – BUT – he is also a man who walks in darkness in some part of his life – too much drinking, gambling, other woman, to much work – something that pulls them away from their internal goodness – away from God – and turns them into a different person, almost unrecognizable – from their normal self.

My father was one of these men. In so man ways he was the best man I have ever known. He was a simple man. He ran an auto repair business. Well, it really wasn’t a business. He fixed cars and people gave him money to do it. I say it wasn’t a business because most businesses are run to maximize profit – to make as much as possible off of every customer on every sale. Try to get your oil changed today – whenever I go for a simple oil change the “service manager (i.e. salesman) comes back with a list of five things I should “consider” having fixed while my car is on the rack. He says its optional but does so with a tone and demeanor that suggests my decision not to is the height or irresponsibility and that my car is going to explode in three days if I don’t have the repairs done. It’s all business. Just change my oil, man – quit trying to soak me for money that I don’t have.

My father was the opposite. He was a wiz in fixing cars and he loved to do it - it was not his job, it was his passion. He also loved people – he loved being able to help and serve them by fixing their cars. We lived in a small town, so he knew all of the people he worked for – most of them were factory workers, tradesmen, farmers, teachers, and small businessmen. He knew their families, knew their struggles and knew their hearts – it wasn’t business – it was a friend helping out a friend.

Therefore, he charged people very little, always thinking about their situation, knowing they’d been out of work, or had a sick child – never wanting to create another stress for them due to an expensive repair. So, my dad would fix their car – he would spend a lot of time trying to figure out a way to solve their problem as cheap as possible. He would then charge them based on what he needed to meet his own responsibilities – not an hourly rate or inflated cost. For instance, he knew that my mom would be showing up in the afternoon needing $20 for groceries (it was 1970), so he would ask for the amount he needed = to meet his basic needs – in exchange for helping his “customer.”

What would the world be like if we all lived within our means and were satisfied with “our daily bread?” That is what my father worked for – his daily bread. He was grateful to be able to do something he truly loved, help others and meet his family’s needs.

In so many ways my father conducted himself like a or as a Christian should – not by the rules of a Capitalist system – that honors profit over everything else – but by the rules of Christ – to do unto others, to care for the widows and orphans, to look out for our fellow man. Don’t get me wrong – I think profit is a good thing, but as one old farmer who used to come into dad’s shop always said, “ I don’t mind you making a dollar, but I do mind if you make two.” Excessive profit is my issue. Being soaked with fees, taxes, fines, late charges, interest and upselling. It is constant – everyone is after your wallet at all times. When do we have enough?

I am often confused when I think of my father. While he was so good in so many ways – he was lost in so many others. He was not a believer. He was a petty thief – but only from “big” companies, the ones who “screwed the little guy” and “killed small businesses.” His darkness spread into other areas of his life – it does little good to dredge up all the dirty details of a man who has passed on. He was a good man. He had a heart for service and for caring for others. He struggled with sin – as we all do – but did not have faith to guide him through the darkness, so he submitted to it.

In his final year, while he was dying of Cancer, a man showed up at his house, a man he worked with many years before, a believer. This man spent time with my dad and asked if he was right with the Lord. My dad said no, but that he wanted to be. My father accepted Christ into his heart on that day and finished his days on earth in relationship with the Lord. I thank God for that man coming to my childhood home and talking with my father. Every time I hear this song I think of my dad – especially the line, “ Lord please believe in him, like I believe in you.” I pray that my father truly had Christ in his heart and that he found the peace that passes all understanding – and that I will be with him again in the end.

Peace & God Bless!

Thanks | Reviewer: Anonymous | 3/6/08

I love the song and every time I hear it it makes me think of my daddy you know he might have drank and appered as a bad guy but he was there when I needed him and this song reminds me so much of him thanks for writting it

AWESOME!!! | Reviewer: maya swift | 5/29/07

this song is so awesome, man!!! i really like it. it's so sweet!!! it's a really good song for falling asleep to.

need | Reviewer: suzie | 4/7/07

HI i like the lyrics to the song i am also trying to finr the chords for the song one in the fire by trent tomlinson hopefully you could help me thank you suzie lethaby

great | Reviewer: g | 7/17/06

That's my man..not so good at being a husband... but a great daddy that loves his kids with every inch of his big heart!



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