Hurricane Lyrics - Bob Dylan

Review The Song (6)



Pistols shots ring out in the barroom night
Enter Patty Valentine from the upper hall
She sees the bartender in a pool of blood
Cries out "My God they killed them all"
Here comes the story of the Hurricane
The man the authorities came to blame
For something that he never done
Put him in a prison cell but one time he could-a been
The champion of the world.

Three bodies lying there does Patty see
And another man named Bello moving around mysteriously
"I didn't do it" he says and he throws up his hands
"I was only robbing the register I hope you understand
I saw them leaving" he says and he stops
"One of us had better call up the cops"
And so Patty calls the cops
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And they arrive on the scene with their red lights flashing
In the hot New Jersey night.

Meanwhile far away in another part of town
Rubin Carter and a couple of friends are driving around
Number one contender for the middleweight crown
Had no idea what kinda shit was about to go down
When a cop pulled him over to the side of the road
Just like the time before and the time before that
In Patterson that's just the way things go
If you're black you might as well not SHOW up on the street
'Less you wanna draw the heat.

Alfred Bello had a partner and he had a rap for the corps
Him and Arthur Dexter Bradley were just out prowling around
He said "I saw two men running out they looked like middleweights
They jumped into a white car with out-of-state plates"
And Miss Patty Valentine just nodded her head
Cop said "Wait a minute boys this one's not dead"
So they took him to the infirmary
And though this man could hardly see
They told him that he could identify the guilty men.

Four in the morning and they haul Rubin in
Take him to the hospital and they bring him upstairs
The wounded man looks up through his one dying eye
Says "Wha'd you bring him in here for ? He ain't the guy !"
Yes here comes the story of the Hurricane
The man the authorities came to blame
For something that he never done
Put in a prison cell but one time he could-a been
The champion of the world.

Four months later the ghettos are in flame
Rubin's in South America fighting for his name
While Arthur Dexter Bradley's still in the robbery game
And the cops are putting the screws to him looking for somebody to blame
"Remember that murder that happened in a bar ?"
"Remember you said you saw the getaway car?"
"You think you'd like to play ball with the law ?"
"Think it might-a been that fighter you saw running that night ?"
"Don't forget that you are white".

Arthur Dexter Bradley said "I'm really not sure"
Cops said "A boy like you could use a break
We got you for the motel job and we're talking to your friend Bello
Now you don't wanta have to go back to jail be a nice fellow
You'll be doing society a favor
That sonofabitch is brave and getting braver
We want to put his ass in stir
We want to pin this triple murder on him
He ain't no Gentleman Jim".

Rubin could take a man out with just one punch
But he never did like to talk about it all that much
It's my work he'd say and I do it for pay
And when it's over I'd just as soon go on my way
Up to some paradise
Where the trout streams flow and the air is nice
And ride a horse along a trail
But then they took him to the jailhouse
Where they try to turn a man into a mouse.

All of Rubin's cards were marked in advance
The trial was a pig-circus he never had a chance
The judge made Rubin's witnesses drunkards from the slums
To the white folks who watched he was a revolutionary bum
And to the black folks he was just a crazy nigger
No one doubted that he pulled the trigger
And though they could not produce the gun
The DA said he was the one who did the deed
And the all-white jury agreed.

Rubin Carter was falsely tried
The crime was murder 'one' guess who testified
Bello and Bradley and they both baldly lied
And the newspapers they all went along for the ride
How can the life of such a man
Be in the palm of some fool's hand ?
To see him obviously framed
Couldn't help but make me feel ashamed to live in a land
Where justice is a game.

Now all the criminals in their coats and their ties
Are free to drink martinis and watch the sun rise
While Rubin sits like Buddha in a ten-foot cell
An innocent man in a living hell
That's the story of the Hurricane
But it won't be over till they clear his name
And give him back the time he's done
Put him in a prison cell but one time he could-a been
The champion of the world.







Click here to submit the Corrections of Hurricane Lyrics
Thanks to Lukeee for submitting Hurricane Lyrics.
Bob will you go out with me? | Reviewer: Sexy girl 202 | 10/24/10

Bob is so hot, his voice was so sexy. I loved it. I loved it so much. I downloaded the song and put it on my phone, I made it my ringtone, message tone and alarm. He really knows how to charm a girl. I also have ALL his other songs, they're just.. so.. sensitive and I guess, sexy. I LOVE YOU SO MUCH BOB!
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx



In the shoes of the "Hurricane" | Reviewer: the man within the hurricane | 5/12/10

The hurricane man I've heard this song so much I was there when this actually occured it was extremely sad to watch an innocent man be jailed due to his race I'm not saying it was right or wrong I'm not the judge of that but still the police man who I will not name listen to the song or read the story to find his name... had some guy testify that rubin did it and that guy would be free of all charges or something and he did he testified that Rubin did it and he lied to the entire court and Rubin was put behind bars for so many years.

It was a sad day for me because someone in my family had the same thing happen to him but enough about that lets look to the future and make sure none of this ever happens again.



The Story of The Hurricane | Reviewer: Steve Borrow | 3/28/08

This is one of the best protest songs ever composed. In eleven short stanzas, Bob Dylan gets to tell the whole story of the 1966 frame-up of Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, whose real crime, Bob asserts, was being a black man in the wrong place at the wrong time. It was released on the Desire Album on 5 January 1976, just after Blood on the Tracks.

We find none of the abstraction here as in, say, Blonde on Blonde. The song unrolls like a cinematic experience with the powerful chorus reinforcing the central theme: “this is the story of the Hurricane, a man the authorities came to blame for something that he never done”. Note the deliberate “done” for “did”. Bob is championing Rubin’s cause and wants us appreciate his perspective, to have empathy for him, so he presents the narrative in a vernacular the Hurricane might use himself. The gravity of the injustice is measured by the denial of Rubin’s manifest destiny to become world middleweight boxing champion. Scarlet Rivera’s violin perfectly compliments the bottom sound, pulsing like a heartbeat to Bob’s oration – he recites the verses, rather than sings them.

Towards the end of the song, Bob make brilliant use of irony. He provides a visual snapshot of the incarcerated Rubin with his bald head, assuming the pose of the Gotama Buddha, the universal embodiment of tranquility and forbearance, and contrasts that with the real perpetrators who are free to enjoy all night cocktail parties in their tuxedos and bow ties, just like old time gangsters:

“Now all the criminals in their coats and their ties are free to drink martinis and watch the sun rise, while Rubin sits like Buddha in a ten-foot cell, an innocent man in a living hell”.

Bob excels at this narrative story telling. Song to Woody, Ballad of Hollis Brown, Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll, John Wesley Harding, Billy, and Joey (on the same album) are examples of this biographical song writing.

Rubin was freed in 1985 and in 1999 Academy Award winner, Denzel Washington, played his character in the movie Hurricane, which engendered a lot of sympathy for him. Rubin, now 70 years of age, is a popular public speaker making up for lost time.



The Story of The Hurricane | Reviewer: Steve Borrow | 3/28/08

This is one of the best protest songs ever composed. In eleven short stanzas, Bob Dylan gets to tell the whole story of the 1966 frame-up of Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, whose real crime, Bob asserts, was being a black man in the wrong place at the wrong time. It was released on the Desire Album on 5 January 1976, just after Blood on the Tracks.

We find none of the abstraction here as in, say, Blonde on Blonde. The song unrolls like a cinematic experience with the powerful chorus reinforcing the central theme: “this is the story of the Hurricane, a man the authorities came to blame for something that he never done”. Note the deliberate “done” for “did”. Bob is championing Rubin’s cause and wants us appreciate his perspective, to have empathy for him, so he presents the narrative in a vernacular the Hurricane might use himself. The gravity of the injustice is measured by the denial of Rubin’s manifest destiny to become world middleweight boxing champion. Scarlet Rivera’s violin perfectly compliments the bottom sound, pulsing like a heartbeat to Bob’s oration – he recites the verses, rather than sings them.

Towards the end of the song, Bob make brilliant use of irony. He provides a visual snapshot of the incarcerated Rubin with his bald head, assuming the pose of the Gotama Buddha, the universal embodiment of tranquility and forbearance, and contrasts that with the real perpetrators who are free to enjoy all night cocktail parties in their tuxedos and bow ties, just like old time gangsters:

“Now all the criminals in their coats and their ties are free to drink martinis and watch the sun rise, while Rubin sits like Buddha in a ten-foot cell, an innocent man in a living hell”.

Bob excels at this narrative story telling. Song to Woody, Ballad of Hollis Brown, Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll, John Wesley Harding, Billy, and Joey (on the same album) are examples of this biographical song writing.

Rubin was freed in 1985 and in 1999 Academy Award winner, Denzel Washington, played his character in the movie Hurricane, which engendered a lot of sympathy for him. Rubin, now 70 years of age, is a popular public speaker making up for lost time.



Racial Prejudice | Reviewer: Ray Sharma | 6/5/07

this is about a boxer being setup and sent to jail for something he didnt do.



learn the words | Reviewer: Jesus | 12/19/04

well its an epic 8.31 minutes long and if it lasted a week it would still be to short not dylan at his best but it is quite frankly fantastic but if you want to watch the fairly ordinary film don't listen to this song it gives away the whole plot. Useless fact the album version was edited from 3 or 4 studio sets. Anyway great song although booze is making me sing and wake up my whole house! Bye xxxx





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------ Performed by Bob Dylan

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------ 07/31/2014

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