Du Hast (German lyrics) Lyrics - Rammstein

Review The Song (27)



Sie ...
Sie hassen ...
Du hast mich ...
Sie ...
Sie hassen ...
Du hasst mich ...
Sie ...
Sie hassen ...
Du hasst mich ...
Sie ...
Sie hassen ...
Du hasst mich ...

Sie ...
Sie hassen ...
Du hasst mich ...
Du hasst mich ...
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Du hast mich gefragt ...
Du hast mich gefragt ...
Du hast mich gefragt, und ich habe nichts zu sagen!

Willst du bis der Tod euch scheidet,
treu sein, sie für alle Tage?
(Yeah)
Nein!
(Yeah)
Nein!

Willst du bis der Tod euch scheidet
treu sein, sie für alle Tage?
(Yeah)
Nein!
(Yeah)
Nein!

Sie ...
Sie hassen ...
Du hasst mich ...
Sie ...
Sie hassen ...
Du hasst mich ...
Sie ...
Sie hassen ...
Du hasst mich ...
Du hasst mich ...
Du hast mich gefragt ...
Du hast mich gefragt ...
Du hast mich gefragt, und ich habe nichts zu sagen!

Willst du bis der Tod euch scheidet
treu sein, sie für alle Tage?
(Yeah)
Nein!
(Yeah)
Nein!

Möchten Sie den Tod, die Unterscheidung
sie lieben auch in schlechten Tagen?
(Yeah)
Nein!
(Yeah)
Nein!

Willst du bis der Tod euch scheidet
treu zu ihr? ...
(Yeah)
Nein!
(Yeah)
Nein!



Click here to submit the Corrections of Du Hast (German lyrics) Lyrics
there IS a double meaning | Reviewer: Anonymous | 12/22/13

guys, it IS a double meaning. when it is written, they appear as different words. when it is spoken, they sound the same. it is impossible to write a double meaning where the two words are spelled differently. it's like using the words steel and steal as a double meaning (taking two random homophones as an example.) when you write it, you cant see the double meaning because you cant spell it both ways at the same time. when you say it, the words sound the same, and there you can see the double meaning.
it is widely known that Rammstein did intend a double meaning on hast/hasst. du hasst mich (you hate me) and du hast mich (you have me) which leads to du hast mich gefragt (you asked me, or you have asked me.) naturally they could only pick one for the title, so they went with hast. theres probably a reason for that, but i dont know it.

English translation | Reviewer: Neil Forehand | 9/25/13

You ...
You hate ...
You hate me ...
You ...
You hate ...
You hate me ...
You ...
You hate ...
You hate me ...
You ...
You hate ...
You hate me ...

You ...
You hate ...
You hate me ...
You hate me ...
You asked me ...
You asked me ...
You asked me and I did not say anything!

Will you until death do you part,
be faithful to her for all days?
(Yeah)
No!
(Yeah)
No!

Will you until death do you part
be faithful to her for all days?
(Yeah)
No!
(Yeah)
No!

You ...
You hate ...
You hate me ...
You ...
You hate ...
You hate me ...
You ...
You hate ...
You hate me ...
You hate me ...
You asked me ...
You asked me ...
You asked me and I did not say anything!

Will you until death do you part
be faithful to her for all days?
(Yeah)
No!
(Yeah)
No!

Want to death, the distinction
love them even in bad days?
(Yeah)
No!
(Yeah)
No!

Will you until death do you part
be true to you ...?
(Yeah)
No!
(Yeah)
No!

Better English lyric for "Du, Du" (NOT a translation, a NEW lyric.) | Reviewer: Eric Peter Nelson | 9/5/13

Du, Du (Rose of My Heart)
English Lyric by Eric Peter Nelson

You, you, you are my darling
You, you, rose of my heart
Love you when you are near me
Long for you when we’re apart

Ja, ja, ja, ja
You are the rose of my heart
Ja, ja, ja, ja
You are the rose of my heart

You, you, love you forever
Love you longer than time
You, you, cling to me only
Say that you’ll always be mine

Ja, ja, ja, ja
Say that you’ll always be mine
Ja, ja, ja, ja
Say that you’ll always be mine

EPN

Enlightenment | Reviewer: Ana | 3/3/13

I don't speak German fluently or otherwise, even though I took 4 years of lessons, a long time ago. I didn't know the word "Hass" but I know that "Du has mich gefragt" is "You asked me", and for me, the explanation of all in this "pow wow" is this:
"For all you morons who think it's "you hate me," shut the fuck up and take a year of German before you go running your mouth about the language. Seriously, the ignorance is enormous here. Let me enlighten you ignorant twats.
"Hast" is the conjugation for the verb "haben" (which means "to have") for the pronoun "du" (which is the informal singular "you").
Now, there is also the verb "hassen" which conjugates to "hasst" for "du" (so "you hate me" would be "du hasst mich"). However, hast and hasst are two COMPLETELY DIFFERENT words.
Furthermore, he is saying "du, du hast, du hast mich," and eventually he says "du hast mich gefragt" which means "you asked me"
Then "und ich hab nichts gesagt" is "and I had nothing to say".

"Hast" is not a noun, it never was a noun; it's a conjugation of a verb. (The noun "hate" is "Hass"). Also notice that "hast" isn't even capitalized. All nouns in German are capitalized, no exceptions.

Now the next time you morons get the idea to start running your mouths about a language that you don't understand, do us all a favor and STFU instead."

This was the first time I listend to Ramstein, btw, and I was quite impressed and wish to listen some more, in all due time. Thank you for introducing me to the wonderfull world of discussion around Ramstein lyrics.

Double-meaning. | Reviewer: Greg | 1/16/13

There IS a double-meaning in the song ... Rammstein DID THAT ON PURPOSE. Go watch the music video and maybe it will make a little more sense. The 'du has(s)t or 'you hate me' is probably from the guy's POV, while the 'du hast' or 'you have me' is probably from the girl's POV (from the music video).

Don't diss the others if your own grammar is bad! | Reviewer: Anonymous | 10/10/11

(Why haven't any of you "geniuses" calling each other "morons" and arguing over grammar (lol) in a song pointed out that it should be "Treu ihr seid" not "sein"?)

They are not saying "you all" (ihr seid) they are saying "[to be] faithful to her" (treu ihr sein). Don't be a grammar snob if you don't even know Deutsch, besonders wenn du falsches Deutsch sprichst. These are WEDDING VOWS, auf die Rammstein anspielt. Nice try, aber uebung macht den Meister, tja?

Geniuses!! | Reviewer: Anonymous | 9/30/11

Why haven't any of you "geniuses" calling each other "morons" and arguing over grammar (lol) in a song pointed out that it should be "Treu ihr seid" not "sein"?

Rammstein sind ein aussergewohnlichen band...sie spielen mit dem doppelbedeutung des wortes, und interessieren sich vermutlich nicht uber diese grammatische einzelheiten.

Read what it's says not what you want it to. | Reviewer: Kadrina Vato | 9/28/11

Okay i speak German fluently and the official lyrics say "you have, you have me" not "you hate you hate me". I'll be the first to admit that german is a wierd and complicated language but it is very clear that it's the verb haben not hassen. They sound similar but are not the same. Even English has such words (words that sound the same). It means what it means and don't go making up stuff. It'll mess up the song.

YOUR ALL STUPID | Reviewer: Dylan | 8/20/11

THE BAND THEMSELVES ARE GERMAN! THEY CREATED THE SONG WITH INTENTIONS OF DOUBLE MEANINGS LIKE THEY DO IN ALLLLLL OF THEIR SONGS! WHO CARES ABOUT 'HAST' AND 'HASST' JUST SHUT THE FUCK UP AND ENJOY THE BEAUTIFUL MUSIK RAMMSTEIN GAVE TO US!!!!

nobody knows German :/ | Reviewer: yavannatr | 8/6/11

everybody is wrong!!! :@ :@ in this lyrics, "hast" is not means "hate" !!!


"HAST" comes from "HABEN" and means in English
"HAVE".You can say " Du hast ein ... " That means "You have...(something what you have)"... But...if you want to say a sentence in past, you MUST use the verb "HABEN" in German. For example: " Du hast gegessen. " That means "You ate/You have already eaten"...So,"gefragt" is the verb in this lyrics and means in English "ask". blah blah blah... I don't want to teach you German.Now I write real means for you:

Du..... You
Du hast.....You have
Du hast mich...You have me :P(this can be wrong)
Du hast mich gefragt.....you asked me
und ich hab nicht gesagt.....and I didn't say (maybe anything :P)

Du Hast review | Reviewer: lambsblood | 7/14/11

This is a great rant. Sung with hate and frustration
by someone obsessed with an ex-love. They are purposely
singing double meanings into the sounds of the German
words (verbs haben and hassen when conjugated with
the 'you' pronoun 'du' *sound* alike- 'du hast' and
du hasst'.) Of course, the printed lyrics are
'du hast'. Rammstein themselves are aware of the
double meaning and purposely sing in the English
version 'You hate' - just to mix things up.

When you first hear 'Du' over and over, it's just 'You'.
Then you hear 'Du hast' which *sounds* like 'Du hasst' which
means 'You hate'. Then you hear 'Du hast mich' which *sounds*
like 'You hate me'. Then suddenly the meaning changes, since
there is a verb thrown at the end. 'Du hast mich gefragt' which
means 'You asked me'. (or literally, 'you have asked me'.)

Then the rest of it follows, paraphrasing a wedding vow
gone wrong. 'You asked me' 'And I said nothing'.
'Will you be true to each other until death separates you?'
*no!* then, 'will you love her until death separates you?'
again *no*.

Then the rant/chant of you.. hate.. etc. again. Brilliant song!


you hate me- not! you have me- not! let's say, something in between :) | Reviewer: Anonymous | 7/5/11

I've been studying German for 6 years now. I'm not as fluent as i know the grammar of the language, and as for pure logic is concerned, due to the grammatical rules, i think that 'du hast' at the beginning of the song is the introduction to the 'du hast mich gefragt' phrase, which means 'you asked me'.
We're talking about the verb 'haben', meaning 'to have', right?
'Hast' here is nothing but an auxiliary verb, like we have in English.
To put it a bit clearer, no one is saying 'you have me' at the beginning, in my opinion.
I think it should be translated as 'you, you, you asked me, and i said no'
i'm Serbian btw, and in my language, it does make sense. :)

it's YOU HAVE ME. | Reviewer: Nikki | 6/15/11

For all you morons who think it's "you hate me," shut the fuck up and take a year of German before you go running your mouth about the language. Seriously, the ignorance is enormous here. Let me enlighten you ignorant twats.
"Hast" is the conjugation for the verb "haben" (which means "to have") for the pronoun "du" (which is the informal singular "you").
Now, there is also the verb "hassen" which conjugates to "hasst" for "du" (so "you hate me" would be "du hasst mich"). However, hast and hasst are two COMPLETELY DIFFERENT words.
Furthermore, he is saying "du, du hast, du hast mich," and eventually he says "du hast mich gefragt" which means "you asked me"
Then "und ich hab nichts gesagt" is "and I had nothing to say".

"Hast" is not a noun, it never was a noun; it's a conjugation of a verb. (The noun "hate" is "Hass"). Also notice that "hast" isn't even capitalized. All nouns in German are capitalized, no exceptions.

Now the next time you morons get the idea to start running your mouths about a language that you don't understand, do us all a favor and STFU instead.

-fin.

to all literalists | Reviewer: Anonymous | 5/26/11

Rammstein is famous for word play, the double meaning is meant, just because its written here doesnt mean that the double meaning isnt their when singing, the whole point is du hast and du hasst are pronounced basically the same way...

no double meaning | Reviewer: german maedchen | 3/30/11

I also speak German fluently. This can't be a double meaning!!!! I don't know why some of you are saying that, because if it were "you hate me", then they would say "du hasst mich" with two 's', but they aren't. It's "du hast mich" which means you have me, but we Germans have a different grammar.


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------ 10/22/2014

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