Misunderstood Song | Reviewer: Jeff | 9/4/08

Its about the sun. I learned how to say here comes the sun in german class in under a year so maybe Rachel needs to take it again. Great song, first found it through a norwegian video on youtube, then downloaded it from some norwegian, THANKS NORWAY.

NeuerFan | Reviewer: Anonymous | 8/30/08

i cant speak german but i see similaries hehe i still dont understand the text. is looks like song about sun! :D not girl not Jesus!.. About "Hitler" i heard this version of sonne and i like both of them =D

What this song is all about | Reviewer: Tom | 7/21/08

For those of you who came up with some funny story for this song, you're all wrong! This song ain't about some girl or jesus or anything like that. This song is actually about nothing other than the biggest star in our solar system; The Sun! If you follow the link below you'll find the actual text and the translation, side by side. I am Norwegian and german is not that different from norwegian so i can confirm that the lyric is genuine and not som bullshit. f.ex. "Hier kommt die Sonne" is on Norwegian "Her kommer solen". And in English "Here Comes The Sun". U see the Similarities?

Um... | Reviewer: Rachel | 7/15/08

Why the heck are people discussing 'Du Hast' on the Sonne page?

If you'd like to talk about 'Du Hast' then by all means do so, but do it on the 'Du Hast' page.

Now, I will not pretend I know German (I took German class for a year and all I learned was how to say 'My Name Is...')
However, I asked a German person about this song. They said that they think it's about a girl (as 'D' said)

Also, since I'm bored, I'm posting a translation of the first verse to Welsh

Pawb yn aros am yr golau
Ofna fe, Ofna fe ddim
Mae'r haul yn tywynu mas ô'm llygaid
Bydda fo ddim yn machlyd heno
Ac mae'r byd yn cyfru'n uchel at ddeg.


Anyway, hwyl people.

Hope this helps. | Reviewer: Irene | 4/6/08

I can help with the confusion around Du Hast. I dont know about this You Hate Me translation, it may be true, it may not be. But i know this.
When a couple gets married the priest asks them: do you take blah blah blah... until death do you part. Now what rammstein is singing here:

You asked me, you asked me,
You asked me and i said nothing.
will you until death do you part be faithful for all your days?
NO!
you asked me, you asked me,
you asked me and i said nothing.
will you until death do you part, love her also in bad days?
NO!

Thats the just of the song.
As for Sonne, in the south of Germany where Rammstein comes from, Jesus Christ is often depicted with sun shining out of his hands and eyes as he hangs from the cross. This song is about Him. Whether or not the song is meant in a blasphemous way is difficult to say.

Sonne | Reviewer: D | 2/1/08

Well Rammstein are renowned for their lyrics having 'dual-meanings'.

'Du hast' means NOTHING but 'you have'. HOWEVER in SPOKEN German, hast and hasSt sound the same. The latter means hate, therefore when du hast is heard, depending on context, it could mean hate OR have.

German is a language which is based highly on the genders of nouns. There are 3 words for 'it'. These are: Es (general 'it'; neutral), sie (feminin; she) and er (masculine; he). So no, this is not personification, it is quite correct to call the noun the corresponding 'it' depending on gender.

For example:
Mann: Ist er gross? Frau: Der Baum ist gross.
Man: Is it big? Woman: The tree is big.

As you can see referring to the tree as 'he' is absolutely correct since Baum is a masculine word.

How is this relative to the song? Well, the 'Sonne' could be interpreted literally, or as a person.

Sie ist... She is...

I think he is comparing this girl to the sun - it is always there but never in his reach, perhaps like a girl 'out of his league'. He also describes her as painful, hot, and will never fall from the sky. A sure sign that this girl is too good for him and it hurts him to know he can never have her...

Maybe this helped you, good luck.

Truth | Reviewer: Anonymous | 1/30/08

You know what, I heard the song Du hast in english, and Rammstein sings it himself. and he says, quite clearly "You hate me too say that I will not obey" just to clear that up. Im not making this up go look for the vid yourself. Though i prefer hearing it in german, english just sounds terrible.

thankyou :) | Reviewer: Schnupperlauf | 11/25/07

I am doing German A Level and just want to say thankyou for the translation!

AND with joining in with the general conversation that has been going on

du hast = you have

i have not been taught the wrong thing constantly for the past five years!

Re: Tino Reyna's question | Reviewer: Anonymous | 10/19/07

That is not an official song of Rammstein I heard it from LimeWire because it was a song I had never heard them sing, now I wish I hadn't, but I don't know who wrote the lyrics and yes it is the song Sonne that they used for background music.

One question... | Reviewer: Tino Reyna | 10/6/07

And who composed the song Hitler?

It's got the same background music as in Sonne song. I surely believe it's not Rammstein because they said they're not followers of any political ideology, tendency or racism group, though they wanted to call the attention of conservative people with their music. Most of sources point to Rammstein as their authors, still I'm trying to verify that, in the end, it's only an unknown Neo-Nazi propaganda.

Uh, ja, ooookaaay | Reviewer: Krag | 9/16/07

Do you conjugate? Du hast means, you have. du hast mich gefragt...you have me asked, not you hate me asked. Think about that last statement is completely senseless. It's bad enough that Deutsche can't translate perfectly to
the english language without non speakers muddling it up. Study the verb Haben (to have)

Du hasst is you hate, hass being hatred.Real nice guys, discussing Du Hast in the Sonne section
Class dismissed, Kyle you've passed, lol

Entschuldigen Sie! Achtung! | Reviewer: Roterfleisch | 9/16/07

Perhaps you oughta learn to conjugate the verbs haben (to have) und hassen (to hate). Lay this one down und lernen das Gesetz!
Ich habe, du hast, (I have, you have)
Ich hasse, du hasst, (I hate, U hate)
I'm not German but, my other half is, I talk to those who have something to say and know what they're talking about. Whoever translated what is unknown to me, but it made ihr denkt (yous think)now didn't it? Jetzt, ihr wisst!(yous know)

Tschuss, Krag Enra

sonne rammstein | Reviewer: nutter | 8/23/07

sonne the best rammstein song ive heard in a long time it is a catchy movie as well funny part of it i was watching it a school and the teacher walks past and he said why the hell is she SNIFFING GOLD i told him dont ask me i aint no publisher of the song now piss off but he kept standing there and watching the other songs weird one to figure out that one PS rosenrot is a pretty lame song compared to sonne PEACE OUT-NUTTER rock on


funny video | Reviewer: kyle | 6/29/07

Du haste means you have Du hast means I hate Hier Kommt Die Sonne which is the chorus in this song means here comes the sun i also like how there counting to ten Eins Zwei Drei Veir Funf Sechs Sieben Acht Neun Aus 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 i also like to let u all know if u ever go to germany pronounce Sechs with a Z sound if u say it with and S ur saying Sex so trying to prevent awkward moments

"euch" | Reviewer: Garrett | 6/24/07

I like the way Rammstein uses the passive tense of "ihr" in their lyrics (y'all for those in the midewest lol). And it is quike striking at the beginning of this song

"The English version clearly he says "You hate me". I know, I just heard it last night.

"Du hast gefragen" means "You asked". AT any rate, the song literally means "You hate (me)".
It is strange that the song is distributed as "Du Hast" when it shouldbe title "Du Hasst". But, maybe it is a pun, which makes sense to if you consider the "du hast gefragen".

Strange but it is what it is. I for one originally thought it was "du hast" (you have) UNTIL I heard their English translation which clearly states "You hate". Or maybe Rammstein screwed up here, and mistranslated "du hast" to "you hate" instead of "you have". So, their own English version is wrong!!!!

LOL



The English version clearly he says "You hate me". I know, I just heard it last night.

"Du hast gefragen" means "You asked". AT any rate, the song literally means "You hate (me)".
It is strange that the song is distributed as "Du Hast" when it shouldbe title "Du Hasst". But, maybe it is a pun, which makes sense to if you consider the "du hast gefragen".

Strange but it is what it is. I for one originally thought it was "du hast" (you have) UNTIL I heard their English translation which clearly states "You hate". Or maybe Rammstein screwed up here, and mistranslated "du hast" to "you hate" instead of "you have". So, their own English version is wrong!!!!

LOL

"Fürchtet euch fürchtet euch nicht"

Translated by me "don't worry/don't be afraid"