baby with the baboon heart | Reviewer: angelonmyright | 7/5/12

There was a baby born at Loma Linda Hospital who had a heart transplant and the doctors used a baboon's heart since a human donor was not available. She lived for about 8 days. Thus, the miracle of the baboon heart. It's pretty literal and was just a sensationalized media circus at the time.

Missing the point | Reviewer: PaulKealoha | 6/22/12

Paul Simon is on record as saying that he was unaware of the depth of the political situation in SA at the time he made Graceland. He said very clearly that he was only interested in the music. Simon was not an anti-apartheid campaigner and Graceland had nothing to do with the movement.
Yes, he did join in the singing of N'kosi Sikeleli Africa on-stage which is highly symbolic but it was no act of conscious defiance.

'The baby with the baboon heart' is referring to the amazing advances in medical technology that allow for human heart transplants. Baboon hearts in to babies is a slight stretch but that's called artistic licence.

Awesome | Reviewer: Anonymous | 11/7/10

We connect to the things we understand especially if they take us someplace new and interesting. If our horizon is expanded by the experience then we will connect with even more. Paul Simon has a gift for doing this. He can easily be listed among the best.

a little problem | Reviewer: Anonymous | 6/23/09

<<Each time I watch the DVD of Graceland in Zimbabwe I can't help wondering why the most lasting musical contribution to the anti-apartheid cause was made by a white New Yorker, and a jewish one at that.>>

Most lasting for Americans maybe. I'm sure South Africans have plenty memories of their own. It's also worth noting that a HUGE number of the most prominant white South African anti-apartheid activists were jewish, like Joe Slovo.


How about true South Africans like Vusi Mahlasela? He truly changed the face of the movement with powerful songs and a voice that Paul Simon could only dream of. Don't speak of those peoples' battle against apartheid when you cannot possibly understand. The fact that you claim an American made the "most lasting musical contribution" illuminates the cause of much of the Anti-American sentiment abroad. This sense that everything revolves around us and our culture is pure ignorance. I understand you're probably just a big Paul Simon fan (as am I), but wouldn't you agree we need to be a little more careful about the things we say as to not belittle the contributions of other cultures?

powerful tune | Reviewer: Joe Gillman | 4/11/08

even more powerful today than in 1985 . . . as the miracle and wonders are ten fold . . as are the dangers (the bomb in the baby carriage) . . . as is the need for love . . .

god damn beautiful fucking song.

lasers in the jungle somewhere | Reviewer: Socialist Jew | 12/6/07

<<Each time I watch the DVD of Graceland in Zimbabwe I can't help wondering why the most lasting musical contribution to the anti-apartheid cause was made by a white New Yorker, and a jewish one at that.>>

Most lasting for Americans maybe. I'm sure South Africans have plenty memories of their own. It's also worth noting that a HUGE number of the most prominant white South African anti-apartheid activists were jewish, like Joe Slovo.

Ahead of his time | Reviewer: heyjohnc@gmail.com | 8/28/07

Thanks for these lyrics... I could never work out the line about "the baby with the baboon heart". Each time I watch the DVD of Graceland in Zimbabwe I can't help wondering why the most lasting musical contribution to the anti-apartheid cause was made by a white New Yorker, and a jewish one at that. Thank God for guys like him.

quickie | Reviewer: flob | 6/26/07

great cover by patti smith on twelve. great songs last forever