haha | Reviewer: 565 | 1/20/12

i like the song it differs from other genres songs i have heard

but lets stay real

the lyrics are childish they are about nothing as most lyrics from that time

i mean combination of alice dreams hypnose drugs
itsounds good for drugs users.... not for normal people those lyrics means nothing to me

and i wonder how this band got so much fans for so much years

but on the otherside back in 60 s there where just a band here and there all of them trown out of society

from michael jackson people some real love for singers and for the first time they werent outed of society

Have you fed your head? | Reviewer: Wurzel | 12/26/11

I have always loved this song,since listening to it as a teenager in the sixties. It always seemed exotic,listening in England, with the song being from the hippy culture of the West Coast of America. I think that possibly other reviewers are forgetting about the time in which it was written, and of course the culture. Drug references wouldn't have been considered so much of a matter for discussion,at the time, as they would've been just part of the culture. Having said that,Carrol's imagery, to the eyes of the latter half of the 20th century (and the start of the 21st) can easily appear to be the results of an acid trip, although in the days when written would more likely have been of fungal origin,if not,as is more likely,the result of a fertile imagination. The lyrics are obviously influenced by the Alice books but the song should be considered for what it is, a brilliant product of its time, beautifully crafted and produced, and still sounding fresh today, almost half a century later. On the matter of the,perceived, paedophile leanings of Lewis Carrol,it must be rembered that, at the time,it was quite common for a much older man to marry a very much younger woman.Carrol's undoubted love for Alice Liddell wouldn't have been unusual, but wouldn't have been acted upon until she reached marriagable age,if at all.Let's just enjoy the song. A friend's wife heard it for the first time at a christmas party,she wasn't even born when it was written.She loves it.Doesn't that say something?

Just three things. | Reviewer: sketch | 11/27/11

1. Lewis Carroll wrote the book for a little girl, after making up a story for her one day to entertain her. The book was also meant to teach her about math as well though not 100% sure how to explain how here. He wasn't a pedophile by our idea of it, and he lived in a time where naked children was artistic and considered innocent and precious, to the mainstream at least.

2. The lyric is "Feed Your Head" but many people have said this already so no worries. Anyway. I personally think the drug wordplay in this song was just clever songwriting, more than likely if not definitely inspired by drugs, an inspired era, and a smart, artistic mind.

3. Drugs are incredible and drugs are terrible, and so much more and everything in between. Know your body, know your mind, know your law, know your drugs.

combination | Reviewer: Mischa | 11/22/11

I love this song. It does what every single Alice in Wonderland movie does. It combines both of the books that Lewis Carrol wrote about Alice Liddel (who was in fact a real person).
In the first Alice novelshe fell down a rabit hole and ended up in Wonderland. But in the second book she goes through a looking glass and is NOT in wonderland. Most of the song is about Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. The only refferences to Alice Through the Looking Glass are the chess board and the White night. Niether of which is in the first book.
The only mistake is a very common one. Many people mistakenly call the Queen of Hearts the Red Queen. These two characters are completely different and seperate. The Queen of Hearts is only in the first book. The first novel having a "cards" theme to it's royalty. The Red Queen is only in the second novel, which is chess themed. Many adaptations of Alice in Wonderland make this error.

Firs time I heard it was in Baltimore... | Reviewer: kayfgibbs | 11/12/11

I was quite intrigued by the lyrics and like the music.

I disagree with Trae that it's at all about the 60's but more about that which possessed the 60's hippies in this country. Hallucinogens have been around since the earliest dynasties in Asia. It was only in the 60's that they were obtained by governments and analysed then synthesized in laboratories. Smoking opium was going on in Britain and Europe in the 1800's, I know that for a fact. Acting Out, first recognized in a 70's book, The Neurosis of Our Time, Acting Out, tells all about this ever present problem from the top heirarchies of our civilization to the lowest. Now one truly escapes it, some just make more of from it than others. It started in the garden of Eden with the fall of man and when sin enter the picture things got complicated so here we are. I remember my first PCP experience,scared the heck out of me. Took me years to connect with my was happening in that experience and what caused it. I did LSD in the early 70's before going to Baltimore, it was an enlightnening experience but I would never do it again unless it was under medical supervision.

Firs time I heard it was in Baltimore... | Reviewer: kayfgibbs | 11/12/11

I was quite intrigued by the lyrics and like the music.

I disagree with Trae that it's at all about the 60's but more about that which possessed the 60's hippies in this country. Hallucinogens have been around since the earliest dynasties in Asia. It was only in the 60's that they were obtained by governments and analysed then synthesized in laboratories. Smoking opium was going on in Britain and Europe in the 1800's, I know that for a fact. Acting Out, first recognized in a 70's book, The Neurosis of Our Time, Acting Out, tells all about this ever present problem from the top heirarchies of our civilization to the lowest. Now one truly escapes it, some just make more of from it than others.

Seriously? | Reviewer: trae | 10/6/11

To make meaning of texts, past or present, one might consider Hermeneutic philosophy for starters--it is the point you are all dancing about. Texts are written within the creator's horizon of interpretation--a metaphor for the TIME, PLACE, and LINGUISTIC tradition in which a particular text was written. To make a trustworthy interpretation of a text, one should consider the TIME, PLACE, and LANGUAGE in which it was written.

The allusions to Alice in Wonderland are not subliminal drug references, they are literal. The psychedelic movement of the sixties was a social rejection by the Hippies of their Leave it To Beaver type parents whose escape was alcohol. Meet the hubby at the door, June, with his slippers and a high ball, your hair perfectly done and in a house dress as if you had nothing to do all day but wait. That generation was numbing itself from the horrors of WWII and from the fact that a military industrial complex was slowly seizing control over Washington policy as Eisenhower warned on his way out. THe Beatniks used pot as a counter culture not to numb it self, but to AWAKE. The Hippies used LSD to TUNE IN to these realities, TURN ON people on the an awakening consciousness, and DROP OUT of that impetus. A COUNTER CULTURE seeking to awaken their doors of perception through psycho-tropic substances.

Trae, PhD and user of things that allow for greater insight if you just know where to look : )

The REAL meaning | Reviewer: Brian | 9/28/11

This song was written to the parents about why we like drugs.when we were younger we were fed with all these storys that obv are trips or on drugs, FEED YOUR HEAD as in when your little they feed our head with these storys

quote from Bill Hicks | Reviewer: Anonymous | 9/16/11

“See I think drugs have done some good things for us, I really do, and if you don't believe drugs have done good things for us, do me a favor: go home tonight and take all your albums, all your tapes, and all your cds and burn 'em. 'cause you know the musicians who made all that great music that's enhanced your lives throughout the years.... rrrrrrrrreal f**kin high on drugs.”
Quoting Bill Hicks

Issues | Reviewer: Anonymous | 9/5/11

I don't know why everyone has such an issue... drugs are fun, guys. Sorry, but it's true.
And this song might reference them, but it's not encouraging it.

Y'all should do some anyway though- chill out.

Fantasy | Reviewer: Doug | 9/1/11

I see fantasy as an outlet for the junk you know is wrong in the world. I wrote my book as a 'righting of the wrongs' around me, and as a teaching tool for my kids. I'm not saying I think as Carrol thinks, but this is what makes sense to me. 'The Adventures of little pegleg the pirate and friends' is such a ridiculous fantasy and is politically incorrect to boot. There is no way to try to make one sense out of it without messing up the true intention--entertainment and morals for children. It keeps them engrossed while teaching right and wrong. This is my understanding.

Meaning | Reviewer: 7 | 8/6/11

Yes, the lyric is "feed your head".
Do change it.
My point of view, frankly, is that this song has a hidden meaning about drug use, but it is NOT about PROMOTING it, it is about keeping yourself in check when everyone around you is 'off their heads'.
I believe that the term "feed your head" means to make decisions responsibly and consider the concequences. Feed your head with the knowlege that you can survive when everything else is not logical or in proportion, whether you're high or sober.
Carroll was NOT a pedophile.

Error in the lyrics | Reviewer: Tid | 8/3/11

This is one amazing song, perhaps the song that sums up the hippie drug philosophy of the 1960s better than any other. But, there is a WHOPPING MISTAKE in the lyrics shown here. After "Remember, what the dormouse said" it's not "Keep your head", it's "FEED YOUR HEAD". That's the whole point of the song !!!!!!!

people are strange | Reviewer: jamie | 7/29/11

Grace Slick used an allegory by Carroll and transformed it into a stage to promote the psychedelic scene of the times.

Carroll was a bit off if you do a cursory research of his life. He was, in a literary sense, ahead of his time.

Those who put too much philosophical clout in something they have no possession of need to wake up and live for themselves.

What is Means | Reviewer: Huzefa | 7/28/11

In any other dimension we travel to, that is how it is... There is always a demon in every dimension. They try to find ways to convince you to lose your head. Alice in Wonderland is a less intrusive way of this idea. Keep your head, meaning, if you get to that other dimension, don't get lost... Keep your head.