Reviews for Hurricane Lyrics

Performed by Bob Dylan

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Bob will you go out with me? | Reviewer: Sexy girl 202 | 10/24/10

Bob is so hot, his voice was so sexy. I loved it. I loved it so much. I downloaded the song and put it on my phone, I made it my ringtone, message tone and alarm. He really knows how to charm a girl. I also have ALL his other songs, they're just.. so.. sensitive and I guess, sexy. I LOVE YOU SO MUCH BOB!
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In the shoes of the "Hurricane" | Reviewer: the man within the hurricane | 5/12/10

The hurricane man I've heard this song so much I was there when this actually occured it was extremely sad to watch an innocent man be jailed due to his race I'm not saying it was right or wrong I'm not the judge of that but still the police man who I will not name listen to the song or read the story to find his name... had some guy testify that rubin did it and that guy would be free of all charges or something and he did he testified that Rubin did it and he lied to the entire court and Rubin was put behind bars for so many years.

It was a sad day for me because someone in my family had the same thing happen to him but enough about that lets look to the future and make sure none of this ever happens again.



The Story of The Hurricane | Reviewer: Steve Borrow | 3/28/08

This is one of the best protest songs ever composed. In eleven short stanzas, Bob Dylan gets to tell the whole story of the 1966 frame-up of Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, whose real crime, Bob asserts, was being a black man in the wrong place at the wrong time. It was released on the Desire Album on 5 January 1976, just after Blood on the Tracks.

We find none of the abstraction here as in, say, Blonde on Blonde. The song unrolls like a cinematic experience with the powerful chorus reinforcing the central theme: “this is the story of the Hurricane, a man the authorities came to blame for something that he never done”. Note the deliberate “done” for “did”. Bob is championing Rubin’s cause and wants us appreciate his perspective, to have empathy for him, so he presents the narrative in a vernacular the Hurricane might use himself. The gravity of the injustice is measured by the denial of Rubin’s manifest destiny to become world middleweight boxing champion. Scarlet Rivera’s violin perfectly compliments the bottom sound, pulsing like a heartbeat to Bob’s oration – he recites the verses, rather than sings them.

Towards the end of the song, Bob make brilliant use of irony. He provides a visual snapshot of the incarcerated Rubin with his bald head, assuming the pose of the Gotama Buddha, the universal embodiment of tranquility and forbearance, and contrasts that with the real perpetrators who are free to enjoy all night cocktail parties in their tuxedos and bow ties, just like old time gangsters:

“Now all the criminals in their coats and their ties are free to drink martinis and watch the sun rise, while Rubin sits like Buddha in a ten-foot cell, an innocent man in a living hell”.

Bob excels at this narrative story telling. Song to Woody, Ballad of Hollis Brown, Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll, John Wesley Harding, Billy, and Joey (on the same album) are examples of this biographical song writing.

Rubin was freed in 1985 and in 1999 Academy Award winner, Denzel Washington, played his character in the movie Hurricane, which engendered a lot of sympathy for him. Rubin, now 70 years of age, is a popular public speaker making up for lost time.



The Story of The Hurricane | Reviewer: Steve Borrow | 3/28/08

This is one of the best protest songs ever composed. In eleven short stanzas, Bob Dylan gets to tell the whole story of the 1966 frame-up of Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, whose real crime, Bob asserts, was being a black man in the wrong place at the wrong time. It was released on the Desire Album on 5 January 1976, just after Blood on the Tracks.

We find none of the abstraction here as in, say, Blonde on Blonde. The song unrolls like a cinematic experience with the powerful chorus reinforcing the central theme: “this is the story of the Hurricane, a man the authorities came to blame for something that he never done”. Note the deliberate “done” for “did”. Bob is championing Rubin’s cause and wants us appreciate his perspective, to have empathy for him, so he presents the narrative in a vernacular the Hurricane might use himself. The gravity of the injustice is measured by the denial of Rubin’s manifest destiny to become world middleweight boxing champion. Scarlet Rivera’s violin perfectly compliments the bottom sound, pulsing like a heartbeat to Bob’s oration – he recites the verses, rather than sings them.

Towards the end of the song, Bob make brilliant use of irony. He provides a visual snapshot of the incarcerated Rubin with his bald head, assuming the pose of the Gotama Buddha, the universal embodiment of tranquility and forbearance, and contrasts that with the real perpetrators who are free to enjoy all night cocktail parties in their tuxedos and bow ties, just like old time gangsters:

“Now all the criminals in their coats and their ties are free to drink martinis and watch the sun rise, while Rubin sits like Buddha in a ten-foot cell, an innocent man in a living hell”.

Bob excels at this narrative story telling. Song to Woody, Ballad of Hollis Brown, Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll, John Wesley Harding, Billy, and Joey (on the same album) are examples of this biographical song writing.

Rubin was freed in 1985 and in 1999 Academy Award winner, Denzel Washington, played his character in the movie Hurricane, which engendered a lot of sympathy for him. Rubin, now 70 years of age, is a popular public speaker making up for lost time.



Racial Prejudice | Reviewer: Ray Sharma | 6/5/07

this is about a boxer being setup and sent to jail for something he didnt do.



learn the words | Reviewer: Jesus | 12/19/04

well its an epic 8.31 minutes long and if it lasted a week it would still be to short not dylan at his best but it is quite frankly fantastic but if you want to watch the fairly ordinary film don't listen to this song it gives away the whole plot. Useless fact the album version was edited from 3 or 4 studio sets. Anyway great song although booze is making me sing and wake up my whole house! Bye xxxx




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